Everything About Raspberry Pi


What Is Raspberry Pi?

Raspberry Pi is a credit-card-sized computer. It was created by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, a nonprofit organization in Britain. It was their goal to create cheap programmable computers in order to increase the reach of computers. It was the foundation’s objective to spread coding education throughout the world and to make computers as inexpensive as possible, which is why no model of the Raspberry Pi is priced beyond 35 USD.

This computer is just as capable as our regular sized personal computers. It can be coded in python, scratch, and host of other languages. It can perform nearly all functions that you would expect of a regular computer like surfing the internet, playing audio and video content. It can also be used to create spreadsheets, word files and all the other content that can be created on full-sized computers. The advanced models of the Raspberry Pi allow you to run Windows 10 in an embedded form. This means that you can run the OS in a command-line format. It can power all windows appliances and kiosks this way. Raspberry Pi also supports cloud-based servers. This means that you can upload your project to the cloud quite easily. The Raspberry Pi is so powerful that it has even been used by researchers to augment as well as build supercomputers. The Raspberry Pi has incredible capabilities that give you unprecedented freedom to experiment.

However, the Raspberry Pi has some limitations. Its capabilities resemble a modern smartphone or tablet. It has limited memory, about 512 MB and this limit cannot be expanded. Even its processing capacity has limits, resembling a Pentium 2 processor, which clocks around 300MHz. This means that it cannot support heavy software. Its graphics are commendable for its size and cost, but cannot compete with modern GPUs. It, therefore, cannot support programs having high-end graphics efficiently and may lag while doing so. Therefore, you shouldn’t expect the Raspberry Pi to replace your main computer system any time soon.

Raspberry Pi 1

Raspberry Pi 1

Model B

• The model B has the following specifications:
• 512MB RAM
• 2 USB ports
• Ethernet port
• 3.5mm jack for audio out
• HDMI
• ARM1176JZFS 700Mhz processor
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• Composite RCA, HDMI outputs
• 26 0.1” GPIO pins.
The model B runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 512 MB of Ram, HDMI output, RCA composite video output through a 3.5mm jack, and GPIO( General Purpose Input Output) pins. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of jumper cables. HDMI and RCA output cannot be used at the same time. You may connect a soundcard or USB mic to the Raspi. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You can use any android wall charger for this. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Model A+

The model A+ has the following specifications:
• 700 MHz ARM11 processor
• 512 MB RAM
• USB port – 1
• HDMI output
• 3.5 mm jack with audio output and composite video output
• 40-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Camera interface
• Display interface
• Micro SD card slot
The model A+ is smaller and less powerful than the model Bs. It has an ARM processor that runs Linux, 512 MB of Ram, HDMI output, RCA composite video output through a 3.5mm jack, and GPIO( General Purpose Input Output) pins. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of jumper cables. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. A standard Android wall charger should do for this. You will also need a Micro SD card in order to write the OS of the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Model B+

• 700 MHz ARM11 ARM1176JZF S-core
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• 4 USB ports
• HDMI and Composite Video
• 17-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Camera interface
• Display interface
• Micro SD card slot
• Ethernet USB Adapter
The model B runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 512 MB of Ram, HDMI output, CTIA composite video output through a 3.5mm TRRS jack, and GPIO( General Purpose Input Output) pins. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of jumper cables. It features a MIPI display interface. You may connect a soundcard or USB mic to the RasPi. It also has an onboard Ethernet slot. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Raspberry Pi 2

• ARMv7 700MHz Processor
• Cortex 900MHz CPU
• 1GB memory
• 4 USB ports
• Camera interface connector
• MicroSD slot
• 17-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• MIPI display interface

Raspberry Pi 2

The Raspberry Pi 2 runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 512 MB of Ram, HDMI output, CTIA composite video output through a 3.5mm TRRS jack, and GPIO ( General Purpose Input Output) pins. This is the only model to be released of the Pi 2. It is the first model to have a Cortex CPU. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of jumper. It also has an on-board Ethernet slot. The Raspberry Pi 2 features 1 GB of memory that is shared with the GPU, which is more than any of its predecessors.You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Raspberry Pi 3

Raspberry Pi 3

Model B

• ARMv8 Processor
• Cortex 1.2GHz CPU
• 4 USB ports
• Camera interface connector
• MicroSD slot
• 17-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• MIPI display interface
• HDMI Output
• 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz IEE wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.1
The Raspberry Pi 3 B runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 1GB of RAM, HDMI output, CTIA composite video output through a 3.5mm TRRS jack, and GPIO ( General Purpose Input Output) pins. This is the first model of the RasPi 3 series. It runs a Coetrex A53 CPU. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of the jumper. It also has an on-board Ethernet slot. This is the first Raspberry Pi to feature Bluetooth connectivity. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Model A+

• ARMv8 Processor
• Cortex 1.4GHz CPU
• 4 USB ports
• Camera interface connector
• MicroSD slot
• 17-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• MIPI display interface
• HDMI Output
• 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz IEE wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2
The Raspberry Pi 3 A+ runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 512 MB of Ram, HDMI output, CTIA composite video output through a 3.5mm TRRS jack, and GPIO ( General Purpose Input Output) pins. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of the jumper. It also has an on-board Ethernet slot. This is the first Raspberry Pi to feature Bluetooth 4.2. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Model B+

• ARMv8 Processor
• Cortex 1.4GHz CPU
• 4 USB ports
• Camera interface connector
• MicroSD slot
• 17-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• MIPI display interface
• HDMI Output
• 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz IEE wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2
The Raspberry Pi 3 B+ runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 1GB of Ram, HDMI output, CTIA composite video output through a 3.5mm TRRS jack, and GPIO ( General Purpose Input Output) pins. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of the jumper. It also has an on-board Ethernet slot. It features Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity. It also has better and faster Ethernet connectivity. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Raspberry Pi 4 B

• Broadcom VideoCore VI @ 500 MHz
• ARMv8 Processor
• Cortex 1.4GHz CPU
• 4 USB ports
• Camera interface connector
• MicroSD slot
• 17-pin GPIO header with 0.1″-spaced male pins
• Broadcom VideoCore IV 250 MHz GPU
• MIPI display interface
• HDMI Output

Raspberry Pi 4

The Raspberry Pi 4 runs an ARM processor that runs Linux, 1GB of Ram, HDMI output, CTIA composite video output through a 3.5mm TRRS jack, and GPIO (General Purpose Input Output) pins. These pins are male and are connected via female ends of the jumper. The Raspberry Pi 4 also comes in variants having 2GB and 4GB of memory which is shared with the GPU. It is also the first model to feature a Broadcom VI GPU.It has Bluetooth 5.0. You will need to get a 5V power source with a micro USB connector. You need to mount a Micro SD card in order to configure the Pi and input-output devices such as a mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc.

Add-ons You Need to Set up the Raspberry Pi

The low cost of the Raspberry Pi means that you need to get some equipment in order to run the computer that is not included in the box.

Raspberry Pi Kit

SD Card

A microSD card of at least 8 GB is necessary in order to write the Raspbian OS. It is recommended that you get a class 4 or class 10 microSD card. You can also buy a card that is pre-installed with NOOBS or Raspbian.

Display

You need a display monitor in order to code the Raspberry Pi. You can connect the Raspberry Pi with the monitor with an HDMI cable for the best results. However, other options are available for older devices. You can use an LCD monitor, TV or any other display device for this.

Keyboard and Mouse

You need to use these as input devices. You can easily connect these with USB cables to the input ports in the Raspberry Pi. You can use wireless devices if the facility of Bluetooth connectivity is available on your RasPi.

Power Supply

All Raspberry Pi models are powered by the standard micro USB power sources. The power supply must be stable as power spikes may fry the ICs of the Pi. The older models of the Raspberry Pi require around 700mA current at 5V. The models after the RasPi 3B need 2A current at 5V. The standard Android phone chargers usually are of these specifications and work perfectly with the RasPi.

Ethernet Connectivity

This is not necessary in order to run a Raspberry Pi. However, you can use an Ethernet cable to connect to your local network or the internet.

Raspberry Pi Setup

Setting up the Raspberry Pi is an easy job. Follow the steps to set up your RasPi and begin coding. These steps will allow you to install the Raspbian OS and get it up and running.

Download the Image Writer and Raspbian

You can download the latest version of the Raspbian from the Raspberry PI foundation website. It is also available in the torrents. You will need an image writer to write the OS onto the SD card. The win32 disk writer is recommended for this task.

Writing the Image

Use a card reader to insert the card into your PC. Select the Raspbian file. Select the preferred device as the SD card. If you select any other device, it will be corrupted, so follow this step carefully. Use the Image Writer to write the OS on the SD card.

Setting it up

Once you boot the Rasberry Pi, it will show you a configuration screen. If it asks you for a username and password, RasPis comes with a preset username and password.
Login: pi
Password: raspberry
After this, you may set up the Pi according to your requirements. Once done, the Pi will reboot automatically.

Updating Firmware

After rebooting, you will be led to a graphic desktop. Use the sudo commands to update the firmware. This is necessary as the RasPi may not have all the necessary drivers needed for the smooth functioning of the latest version of Raspbian.

Conclusion

The Raspberry Pi is an extremely potent computer that is inexpensive and widely available. You can use ot for personal projects as well as commercial uses. The number of personal projects that can be done using the Pi is immense. Superb projects done by people are all over the internet. Explore the potential of the Raspberry Pi and happy coding!

Vikram Shinde

Vikram is the founder of TopOnlineTool. He is a business man by day and writer by night. He has years of experience in business, technology, finance and marketing field. He loves to share business & finance ideas through his collaboration.

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